Hired

Southern Indiana hires Scott Hooker

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Hired

Southern Indiana hires Scott Hooker

Scott Hooker has been in Evansville for less than a month, but he already has some ideas of what he will focus on in his new position as head athletic trainer.

“The good thing about this position is it does have a good baseline,” Hooker said.

Hooker, who was “good colleagues” with the previous head athletic trainer Luke Steele, said his focus would remain on the most critical areas, which could include staffing and size.

Hooker said the training area is a decent size, but not nearly big enough for the amount of student athletes they have.

“Our biggest priority is the health and welfare of the student athletes,” Hooker said. “You pick your battles and prioritize what you want to change.”

Before he could be in the position to implement any change, he and his wife, who are expecting their first child in February, had to make a lot of changes in both their professional and personal lives.

“My wife worked for the University of Iowa for four years,” he said. “Obviously this had to be a family move because it was taking her away from something. I don’t think we ever envisioned living in southern Indiana, but I think it will be good for us both professionally and personally.”

Before finding this job Hooker was working at Coe College, a Division III school, and also worked for  Physiotherapy Associates, an outpatient physical rehabilitation center. He was an assistant athletic director at Coe, but has experience as head trainer from his time at Kirkwood Community College and McPherson College.

Hooker said after he found the job the more he learned about it the “more and more interested” he became.

He said once he had the interview he liked what he saw. He was ready to be dealing with high caliber student athletes and a successful program backed by tradition.

He and his wife are both midwestern people and felt Evansville was big enough to offer what they wanted, including an airport, which is important to them for visiting family.

Hooker said one major difference will be no longer having a football program. He worked with one for seven years and said Saturday football is something he enjoyed, but in a way it is a perk not having football.

“Football is a grind,” Hooker said.

Without football it will leave a little more free time in Hooker’s schedule.

Hooker said during high school he played sports including baseball, golf and basketball. He has continued to play golf and said it’s a “great sport to be decent at.”

Hooker said he did not play any sports during his time as an undergrad at Kansas State, where he earned his degree in kinesiology and recreation.

He laughed and said he didn’t play sports at a collegiate level.

“That’s why I am an athletic trainer,” he said.

After his time as an undergrad he moved to Iowa State University and earned his master’s degree.

Hooker is ready to get started and is aware there may be some challenges, though he has not experienced any yet, as his he continues through the year, but is optimistic about what that means.

“If it doesn’t have its challenges,” Hooker said, “it probably means something’s wrong.”

ORIGINAL ARTICLE:
http://www.usishield.com/hooker-focuses-on-health-and-welfare-of-student-athletes/