main

Hired

Fordham Names Dawn Purington Head Athletic Trainer

image_handler-1-960x538.jpg

Article reposted from Fordham Sports
Author: Fordham Sports

Dawn Purington, former Senior Assistant Athletic Trainer at Seton Hall University, was named Head Athletic Trainer at Fordham University it was announced today by Director of Athletics David Roach.

In her position at Fordham, Purington will manage all areas of the sports medicine program for the department’s 23 varsity programs and 550 student-athletes. This includes coordinating the proper evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation, and referral of athletically injured student-athletes for physician care.

“We are excited to welcome Dawn to the Fordham Athletic program,” said Roach. “She will be a great addition to the department. Her dedication, administrative experience and vast knowledge will significantly aid all of our student-athletes.”

Purington served as the Senior Assistant Athletic Trainer at Seton Hall since September of 2015. She worked closely with the Pirate women’s basketball and tennis programs as well as serving as the Administrator for Athletics, which involved problem solving while traveling with teams and being the liaison between University coaches, team physicians, medical facilities and health care providers.  She was also the Athletic Training staff’s insurance coordinator, which includes claim reporting, athlete bill resolution and price negotiation.

A 1999 graduate of Southern Connecticut State University, Purington earned her Master’s degree in Athletic Training / Sports Medicine from Temple University in 2001.

Prior to arriving in South Orange, Purington served as the Head Athletic Trainer for the Boston Breakers, a professional women’s soccer team, for eight seasons, working out of St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Brighton, Mass. From December of 2011 through September of 2015, and Cambridge Health Alliance from October 2008 through December of 2011.  Responsibilities included the communication and coordination of worker’s compensation claims, being the medical liaison between the team’s general manager, coaches, physicians, physical therapists and athletes, and various other clinical duties.

Before a short stint as a neurological sales consultant for Dynasplint Systems Inc., Purington served as a an Assistant Athletic Trainer for eight years, the first two as a graduate assistant at Temple University, the middle four at the University of Pennsylvania and the last two at Merrimack College where she was also a member of the clinical faculty.

Purington resides in Maplewood, N.J.

Hired

Mattie Silva returns to her Alma Mater as athletic trainer

AR-170909609.jpg

Article reposted from The Garden City Telegram
Author: 

Mattie Silva feels as though it was God’s calling and timing for her to return to Garden City.

Silva, a 2012 Garden City High School graduate is a Sienna Medical Clinic outreach athletic trainer for GCHS. Her first day on the job with the school district was Aug. 14, she said.

“It’s kind of crazy. It’s come full circle,” Silva said. “I started (athletic training) my senior year during basketball season,” Silva said, adding that her love for athletic training started when she tore her ACL’s about a year apart from one another. “Through that time, I got to spend a lot of time with Cassy (Boyd, GCHS’ then-athletic trainer) doing a lot of rehab and getting to understand what an athletic trainer was, and I just kind of fell in love with it.”

After high school, Silva attended Garden City Community College, where she received an athletic training scholarship. Following her two years at GCCC, she attended Washburn University, graduating in May 2017 with a Bachelors of Science degree in athletic training with a minor in fitness.

The “crazy” part for Silva is that she’s always seen herself being an athletic trainer at GCHS.

“Whenever I said I wanted to be an athletic trainer, this is where I pictured myself being one,” Silva said. “God’s really allowed me to be what I was dreaming about.”

Silva said she also feels in her element with athletic training.

“It’s pretty much been a part of my life for the past five or six years now. It’s been my norm,” Silva said. “It’s something that I haven’t gotten tired of doing and I enjoy it.”

Silva’s duties as GCHS’ athletic trainer includes overseeing sports practices and assisting student athletes with injuries they may have received during games or practices.

“I oversee all the practices, mainly the football practices because that’s typically where most of the injuries happen, but I get calls from the other sports,” Silva said. “Then if they need to see me, they meet me in the athletic training room.”

Silva also travels with the varsity football team to its away games and covers all home sporting events at the high school, and once a week, she visits Kenneth Henderson and Horace Good Middle Schools to assist the student-athletes there.

The typical injuries Silva sees are ankle sprains, blisters, small wound care, and over-use injuries, she said.

Silva said transitioning to her new job was a bit hectic at first, but knowing the GCHS coaches, as some of them were coaching when she was in school and were even her coaches or teachers has made it easier.

“It’s been crazy, but that’s how athletic training is. You have a lot of people coming in, a lot of people going out,” Silva said. “It’s organized chaos, but now that I’m getting into the routine of things, they have been going smoothly.”

In her spare time, Silva enjoys sleeping, spending time with her family, and attending bible study. She is the daughter of Raul and Anna Silva and has four siblings: Jordan Martinez, Raul Silva Jr., Issac Silva, and AJ Marroquin.

“I’m just really glad to be back in my hometown and being a part of this culture is great,” Silva said. “I’ve really enjoyed it so far and I hope to continue to enjoy it.”

Hired

New Athletic Trainer Inspired by Brother’s Injuries

C_ezfoWXgAAYMk9.jpg

Article reposted from The Chronicle
Author: 

Brian Gallagher has been named the new Director of Sports Medicine for the upcoming school year. With a background in athletic training, Gallagher said he is prepared to further develop the sports medicine department.

Gallagher studied Athletic Training at West Chester University of Pennsylvania and later earned an MA in Kinesiology and Sports Management from the University of Connecticut. After graduating, Gallagher worked at the University of Connecticut and Stanford University. Certified in Athletic Training at the collegiate level for fifteen years, Gallagher said his wide array of jobs deepened his childhood passion for athletics.

He said he discovered his passion for sports medicine as a result of his brother’s extensive injury.

“I always had my fair share of injuries, but when my brother got injured in college, I was forced to learn [about] his condition,” said Gallagher. “I understood what being a trainer really was. Through the process of evaluating his injuries and his rehabilitation, my eyes were opened to a field of sports I never knew existed. From that point on, I realized what being an athletic teacher took, and I just immediately fell in love with the idea of becoming one.”

Gallagher said he highly anticipates working alongside his colleagues and the progress of the sports medicine department.

“I’m really looking forward to establishing an identity and building the Sports Medicine Department with my colleagues,” said Gallagher. “We all share a common vision of where we want the Sports Medicine Department to go, and I’m ready and excited to surround myself with the staff and administration, as well as the entire Harvard-Westlake Community.”

Hired

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Hires Austin Jones

image_handler-960x562.jpg

Article reposted from RPI
Author: RPI

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) athletic training department has added Austin Jones to the staff, Dr. Lee McElroy, associate vice president and director of athletics, has announced. Jones is one of seven full-time athletic trainers at Rensselaer, a staff led by Chris Thompson.

A native of Nassau, N.Y., Jones is a graduate of both Hudson Valley Community College and Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. He earned an associates in physical education with a concentration in sports medicine from the former and a bachelors in athletic training from the latter.

While in his final year at MCLA, Jones gained experience at Rensselaer as part of his degree requirements. He worked closely with Thompson, assisting student-athletes from each of RPI’s 23 intercollegiate varsity teams.

Jones also gained clinical experience at Southern Vermont College, where he worked with many of the women’s teams, as well as with the Williams College football team. He also worked in the athletic training facility while at HVCC.

Print Friendly Version

Hired

The Yorkton Terriers welcome new athletic therapist Caden Allingham

caden.jpg

Article reposted from Yorktown This Week
Author: STEFANIE DAVIS

As the Yorkton Terriers get set to lace up the skates for another season of Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League action, they welcome a new face to take care of things off the ice. 

Caden Allingham was hired in late June to take on the role of athletic therapist/equipment manager for the Terriers this season. The job opened up after former athletic therapist/equipment manager Nathan Hollinger took a new job at the Okanagan Hockey Academy in British Columbia. 

Allingham, from Kincardine, Ont., started his athletic therapy major at Sheridan College in 2011. During his years there, he spent time working as a therapist in a number of sports including hockey, football and baseball. He graduated this past April and said he knew he wanted to pursue a career in hockey therapy.

“With hockey, there’s that team atmosphere. It’s almost like a family relationship,” said Allingham. “Football has egos and stuff like that, and in baseball I didn’t really see many injuries – or if I did, they were all the same.” 

His resume includes working with high school hockey teams and the Ryerson University men’s hockey team. Last hockey season he was with a midget AAA team in Guelph. 

He explained that while he was looking for a job this season, he applied to multiple SJHL teams. Then late one night, he sent his resume along to Terriers’ head coach/GM Casey O’Brien. 

“And that was that,” he said. 

Allingham arrived in Yorkton last week and with fall camp set to start on Friday, he’s been busy.  

He said he’s definitely excited for the season to get going. 

“I’m looking forward to getting back behind the bench again, getting in some hockey games and hopefully going for a winning season,” Allingham said. 

The next week will be busy for the Terriers. 

Their annual golf tournament is on Thursday, Aug. 31 at Deer Park Golf Course in Yorkton. The tournament acts as a fundraiser for the team. 

The weekend will consist of fall camps. Both new and returning players will be coached through a series of camps, endurance sessions and scrimmage games as the coaching staff gets an idea of what they’ll see on the ice for the start of the season.   

Hired

Haenchen Named Assistant Athletic Trainer at Southern Illinois – Edwardsville

haenchen.jpg

Article reposted from SIUE
Author: SIUE

The SIUE Athletic Training Department announced the addition of Sarah Haechen to its full-time staff.

She is a 2017 graduate of Saint Louis University with a master’s degree in athletic training. She earned a bachelor’s degree in exercise science with a concentration in athletic training and interprofessional practice, also from SLU.

“We’re very happy to have Sarah with us,” said Head Athletic Trainer Gerry Schlemer. “She is a great young professional, and we look for many good things from her.”

Haenchen’s major assignments at SIUE will be to work with the volleyball and women’s basketball programs

Haenchen comes to SIUE after spending the past year at Parkway Central High School in St. Louis. She has extensive clinical experience with time at St. Louis Scott Gallagher Soccer Club (2016), Mercy Sports Medicine Clinic (2016), Parkway South High School (2016) and Missouri Baptist University (2015).

She has provided coverage for a number of high-level area events, including the 2017 NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Championships, the Go St. Louis Marathon, the U.S. Men’s Gymnastics Olympic Trials and Nike Elite 100 Basketball.

Haenchen is a member of the National Athletic Trainer’s Association. She is a native of Ballwin, Missouri.

Hired

Horris Joins Middlebury Athletic Training Staff

SportsMedHorrisBlockM.jpg

Article reposted from Middlebury Athletics
Author: Middlebury Athletics

Middlebury College has announced the hiring of Hannah Horris as an assistant athletic trainer. Horris comes to Middlebury from Desert Mountain High School in Scottsdale, Arizona, where she held a similar position.

“The sports medicine team is excited to have Hannah come aboard,” said Director of Sports Medicine Kelly Cray. “She brings enthusiasm and a wealth of rehabilitation skills to the athletes at Middlebury.”

“I am thrilled to return to the northeast as a member of Middlebury’s sport medicine department,” Horris noted. “The institution has a great reputation on and off the playing field and it’s an honor joining an athletic program that has such a deep and rich tradition.”

Horris recently completed her second year at Desert Mountain High School, which competes in Arizona’s highest division, providing care for the school’s 22 sports teams. During that time, she was the lead instructor for a workshop at A.T. Still University working with high school students. Horris also served as a trainer for the Phoenix Desert Cup Tournament for youth soccer, the Under Armour All-America Preseason Tournament at the Baseball Factory and the Mesa Youth Football and Cheer as part of the Datalys Project.

This past summer, Horris earned her master’s degree in athletic training from A.T. Still University in Arizona after receiving her bachelor’s degree in the same field from Boston University in 2015. At BU, she gained clinical experience working with the institution’s Division I men’s basketball and women’s ice hockey programs, while spending part of two other semesters with the Boston College and Tufts athletic departments.

Hired

Amy Mausser Joins Sting as Athletic Therapist

AMY-1024x549-960x515.jpg

Article reposted from Sarnia Sting
Author: Sarnia Sting

General Manager, Nick Sinclair announced earlier today that the Sarnia Sting have added Amy Mausser to the club’s hockey operations staff as the new Athletic Therapist.

“I’m thrilled to join the Sting staff and be a part of the program they’re building here in Sarnia,” says Mausser. “With Training Camp getting underway on Monday, it’s a very exciting time and I can’t wait to get started.”

For the last two years, Amy served as the Athletic Therapist, Equipment Manager and Strength & Conditioning Coach with the AJHL’s Brooks Bandits. Prior to that, she was a member of the Kingston Frontenacs staff; working as their Athletic Therapist and Head Trainer.

Her academic accolades include a Bachelor of Applied Health Sciences from Sheridan College in Athletic Therapy, a Massage Therapy Certificate from the College of Health and Technology and a Masters of Exercise Science at the University of Connecticut. She is currently working on her Masters of Exercise Science (Human Movement) through A.T. Still University.

General Manager, Nick Sinclair comments on today’s announcement, “Amy is a highly experienced and educated woman with excellent qualifications. We are excited to welcome her to the Sarnia Sting family and believe that she will be a great addition to our staff.”

After hiring former OHL goaltender, Mark Packwood to fill this role on July 13th, unforeseen schedule conflicts recently arose due to his part-time commitment with a clinic in London while completing a second Master’s degree at Western University. The Sting wish Mark the best of luck in furthering his education and pursuing a career in the hockey industry.

Hired

Lindsay Luinstra Joins Shocker Athletic Training Staff

image_handler-2-960x539.jpg

Article reposted from Wichita State Shockers
Author: Wichita State Shockers

The Wichita State athletic training staff is excited to announce the addition of Lindsay Luinstra as an assistant athletic trainer working directly with the women’s basketball and spirit squads.

Luinstra returns to Wichita State after working with the staff as an undergraduate student for four years from 2008-12. She most recently finished a four-year stint at nearby Bethel College. At Bethel, Luinstra began as a graduate assistant athletic trainer before accepting a full-time role as the head athletic trainer. For the past two years she was an assistant athletic trainer working with football.

Luinstra received her master’s degree from Kansas State University in May 2014. While attending K-State she was a graduate assistant for K-State Intramural Athletics. She is currently working towards a Doctoral Degree from the University of Idaho with anticipated graduation date of May 2018.

She is a member of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association and Kansas Athletic Trainers’ Association. She is married to Justin Luinstra and they have two sons, Beau and Jordy.

Follow the Shockers
Download the official mobile app of Wichita State Athletics – Go Shockers. Now, you can stay in touch with the Shockers anytime, anywhere, on your Android or iOS mobile device.

Sign up now for the new and improved Shocker Mail. Get weekly updates on promotions, tickets, events and everything else Wichita State Athletics delivered straight to your inbox.

Hired

Athletic Trainer picks Bearcats over Broncos

Nicholas_Peters_002.jpg

Article reposted from Hillsboro Star Journal
Author: DAVID COLBURN

Athletic trainer and 2004 Goessel High School graduate Nick Peters was perhaps on the verge of something big as he was beginning a second year of working with the NFL’s Denver Broncos.

Having completed a college internship with the Tennessee Titans and with two years of advanced internship experience with the Broncos, Peters might well have gone on to a career in the pros.

But fate intervened in the form of a former colleague at his graduate school alma mater, Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville.

“I always knew if something came up I would look at Northwest,” Peters said. “I already had returned to Denver for my second year, and then a position came open in June of 2012. The head athletic trainer, Kelly Quinlin, called and said, “What do you think about coming back and doing men’s basketball?’”

Peters had developed close relationships with Northwest athletics staff during a graduate assistantship there, and it was a full-time job with benefits.

With the Broncos’ blessing, Peters left one of the NFL’s most successful franchises and the nation’s 19th largest metropolitan area for the Bearcats and Maryville, population 11,800.

“This is a pretty small town; it’s half the size of Newton,” Peters said. “It’s driven by farmers, industry, and the university. There’s no other place in NCAA Division II that compares to it.”

What didn’t change was being immersed in an athletic culture dedicated to winning. Northwest has won six Division II football championships, and Peters was on the bench in March when the men’s basketball team won its first national championship.

“My focus for the final game was to make sure that each player stayed hydrated,” Peters said. “I got to climb the step ladder and snip my piece of nylon. But the head coach always gets to cut the last loop so he can hoist the net for the media.”

The biggest change for Peters at Northwest was having the responsibility to make decisions on an individual athlete’s status.

“I was making the calls,” he said. “I was decidinig if people would practice or sit or have to go see a doctor. That’s the hard part, making decisions that could affect the team when they weren’t expecting it.”

Young players who have been reluctant to sit out have come around when trade-offs have been explained.

“A lot of times it’s sitting an athlete down and saying, ‘You can be at 70 percent for the next two weeks, and the coach will be upset, or we can rest you for five days,’” Peters said.

There are numerous aspects about Northwest’s athletic culture that are relevant for high school and junior high athletes looking ahead to the opening day of practice and competition, Peters said.

“It’s kind of become the motto that ‘culture wins,’” he said. “They recruit players who want to win, not players who want to score 40 points a game. If they’re not going to play as a team, they’re not going to play here. There’s no ego; there’s none of that. It makes it a lot more fun to be around.”

Students considering playing in college should watch how they use social media, as recruiters will look for clues as to how players might fit with the culture.

“When you have social media, if you put it out there, they’re going to find it,” Peters said.

Athletes benefit from playing more than one sport, Peters said.

“On our football team, almost 90 percent of them played more than one sport in high school,” Peters said. “The more things you do, the better your body becomes at adapting to different situations.”

Staying hydrated is particularly important in warm weather and during increased activity, Peters said.

“Water is plenty good,” he said. “Any kind of electrolyte replacement isn’t bad, especially after practice or games. Before and during, water will do the trick. Some people sweat more than others, so electrolytes might be helpful for them.”

Bearcats players forego traditional stretching routines in favor of more active warm-up routines.

“They do more of a dynamic workout, so it’s not a static stretch,” Peters said. “They’re moving through lines, they’re going short distances to get the body temperature up, get the blood moving. Some people may need a little extra with hamstrings or lower backs.”

Students with pre-existing injuries should work closely with coaches, trainers, and medical professionals to develop routines that acclimatize them to their sport.

Weightlifting and conditioning routines will help to prevent fatigue and keep players healthy.

“The more fatigued you get, the higher chance you have of getting hurt,” Peters said. “Muscular injuries happen more at the end of games.”

While coaches and trainers can help, it’s important for athletes to pay attention to any signs of fatigue, injury, or illness and take steps to remain healthy, Peters said.

“Nobody knows their bodies as well as they do,” he said. “Don’t try to cut corners on that. You only get one opportunity with your body, and taking care of it now is a lot easier than taking care of it later.”