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#AT4ALLSecondary SchoolSudden Cardiac Death

Irvington athletic trainer Hana Gross is a true life saver

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Article reposted from lohud
Author: 

Hana Gross does not work at Pelham Memorial High School, but her shift on Dec. 27 ended up being one that would change her life – and that of a local basketball player – forever.

Gross was part of a team of individuals that resuscitated Blind Brook boys basketball player Jordan Schoen after he collapsed in the middle of a game at Pelham Memorial High School and went into sudden cardiac arrest.

Schoen flatlined for about a minute while Gross – along with Pelham detective John Hynes, Pelham police officer Michael Sheehy, and a Blind Brook parent who is a doctor but did not wish to be identified – worked on him.

“You almost turn into a machine and you just do it,” she said, referring to the treatment. “It was literally a perfect storm. Especially being my first time live, to have all that support, you couldn’t ask for a better situation.”

CARDIAC ARREST: Blind Brook basketball player revived during game

CARDIAC ARREST: Blind Brook basketball player recovers in hospital after collapse, revival

UNSUNG HEROES: Behind-the-scenes workers are critical for local athletic programs

Schoen was rushed to New Rochelle Hospital Emergency Department, where he was stabilized, and later transferred to the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx. The Pelham Police Department’s work in blocking traffic allowed Schoen to reach the hospital in just seven minutes.

“You’re never really expecting it,” Gross said of the life-or-death situation. “It’s so rare in the setting of athletic training because you’re with the active, healthy population, so for something like that to happen is really, I think, rare.”

Dr. Robert Pass, the Associate Chief of Pediatric Cardiology at Montefiore Medical Center, performed a two-and-a-half-hour procedure on Schoen that involved putting a defibrillator and pacemaker in his heart.

Pass said the result would have been catastrophic had Schoen not promptly received the proper medical treatment.

“It is the only reason that he is alive,” Pass said.

Gross works for Symmetry Physical Therapy in Pelham, but is contracted to Irvington High School, where she is the head athletic trainer. Ruth Gillespie, who also works for Symmetry and is the head athletic trainer at Pelham, asked Gross to cover for her while she was out of town.

With approximately one minute left in the first quarter, Schoen fell backwards onto the floor.

Gross initially suspected that Schoen fainted from not eating breakfast before the noon tipoff. Schoen quickly began seizing, and when his father Steve informed Gross that his son had no history of seizures, treatment for sudden cardiac arrest began immediately.

The doctor in attendance did chest compressions while the police officers hooked up the automated external defibrillator. Gross tended to Schoen’s airway, which proved to be a prominent factor in his survival.

“CPR being delivered is what prevented this athlete’s death,” said Yorktown athletic trainer Dave Byrnes, president of the Section 1 Athletic Trainers’ Society. “I would bet money that if there were not professional rescuers on scene, that he would not have lived.”

Alice and Jessica Schoen, Jordan’s mother and sister, have taken CPR classes since the incident. Steve and Alice Schoen are now on a mission to highlight the importance of knowing how to conduct CPR and of having defibrillators accessible to the public.

“My son is incredibly lucky,” Alice Schoen said. “I have since learned that there are many teen athletes that aren’t as lucky, and I’m really trying to move forward and educate and learn about the importance of AEDs – that they’re available to the public where needed – and bystander CPR.”

Gross said she did not do anything out of the ordinary.

“When it comes down to it, you’re just doing your job,” she said.

The reality of saving a life also hasn’t hit her, she said, even though a certificate acknowledging her heroic efforts hangs on the wall next to her desk at Irvington High School.

“No, I don’t think so,” she said. “I was almost in a trance for like a week.”

“I don’t even know if I could pick him out of a lineup,” she added.

Gross said the Dec. 27 incident, while horrifying, shows what athletic trainers may sometimes – but hopefully never – have to face on the job.

“I think it’s important for schools to know that we’re not just taping ankles, we’re not slapping ice on kids – it’s bigger than that,” she said. “To have the proper medical coverage is really important.”

Byrnes, the Yorktown athletic trainer, was a little more blunt with his feelings on the value of certified athletic trainers in schools.

“If a school can afford to have sports, they can afford to have an athletic trainer,” he said. “I don’t think you can have one without the other. You wouldn’t drop your kids off at a pool without a lifeguard, but yet every day millions of parents drop their kids off at a practice or a game and there’s no athletic trainer there.”

Twitter: @Zacchio_LoHud
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#AT4ALLSecondary SchoolSudden Cardiac Death

AED saves another athlete in Texas thanks to quick thinking athletic trainer

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Article reposted from USA Today High School Sports
Author:  


When Jesuit soccer star Christian Lerma collapsed during a recent boys soccer match at Dallas-area rival Richardson Pearce, the homestanding Pearce athletic trainer had to think quickly.

Luckily, the school had an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) on site, and training to prepare for just such an evolving situation has become routine enough that Tara Grubbs knew precisely what to do.

“He was kind of gasping, but not breathing,” Grubbs told the Dallas Morning News about the frightening incident. “We learn in CPR, that’s a sign of possible cardiac arrest.

“His eyes were open, but it was like no one was there. He was unresponsive. … By the time the ambulance got there, thankfully he had started breathing and we were able to find a pulse.”

Of course by that point, Lerma’s life had effectively already been saved by Grubbs and others on the scene. The Pearce head athletic trainer had immediately signaled for others to summon emergency help after seeing Lerma on the field. She had a Jesuit player retrieve the AED she brought with her from the school gym to the field then shocked Lerma back into consciousness.

According to Grubbs, her intervention with Lerma marked the third time that a school in Richardson ISD has had to use an AED in the past two years. Perhaps foreseeing such a need, the Richardson ISD placed four AEDs in the halls and facilities at Pearce, access which Grubbs is convinced was nothing short of life-saving.

I would like to thank those who have kept me and my family in their prayers through this difficult time. I would also like to thank Mr. Davis, Mr. Miniguitti, and @MustangsATC for saving my life. I would also like to thank all those teammates who came to visit me in a busy day!

That, combined with ever-expanding awareness of the need for vigilant readiness in the case of a cardiac episode — and the necessary training that goes with it — has helped save numerous lives, both in the Dallas area and beyond.

“I’m very thankful that our school district has provided those for us and sees that they are so important. I don’t think other school districts are as well-equipped as we are.”

Secondary SchoolSudden Cardiac Death

Texas High School player collapses at practice, revived by athletic trainer

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Article reposted from My San Antonio
Author: Adam Zuvanich

Reagan’s basketball season has so far been defined by a series of close losses.

It may ultimately be defined by the way the Rattlers responded in a time of crisis, because their performance under pressure Tuesday morning helped the team avoid the ultimate loss.

A Reagan player, who the Express-News confirmed is reserve junior guard Kaeyel Moore, collapsed on the court and went into cardiac arrest while warming up for Tuesday’s practice. He stopped breathing and was resuscitated by assistant athletic trainer Joe Martinez, who performed CPR and used an automated external defibrillator (AED) before turning Moore over to paramedics.

Martinez and Reagan coach John Hirst both said Wednesday one of their players remains hospitalized and is undergoing tests. Hirst said he is conscious, comfortable and has experienced no more episodes, which is a relief to the rest of the Rattlers.

“It was a life-changing experience for everyone involved yesterday,” Hirst said. “We’re just so grateful and feel so fortunate that things worked out like they did. He could very easily not be with us right now.”

Martinez said Moore was suffering from ventricular tachycardia, a condition in which the lower chambers of the heart beat abnormally fast. Prior to Tuesday, Martinez said he had shown no signs of the condition or experienced any similar issues.

Hirst said he initially thought Moore, a first-year varsity player who has scored six points this season for Reagan (10-12), had tripped and fallen. The coach quickly discovered the situation was more serious and called for Martinez.

Moore had turned blue, was not breathing and did not have a pulse when Martinez began chest compressions and hooked Moore up to the AED, a machine that monitors heart function and provides automated feedback.

“When it said, ‘Shock advised, clear the patient,’ that’s when I knew this was not good,” Martinez said. “He’s in a pretty bad spot right now if he needs a shock.”

Moments after administering the shock and resuming chest compressions, Martinez said Moore started breathing again, regained consciousness and even was coherent and smiling. An ambulance took Moore to North Central Baptist Hospital, which is directly behind the Reagan campus.

Martinez, 27, a San Diego, Texas, native in his second year at Reagan, said it was the first time he had to use CPR and an AED in a “real-life scenario.” He said he merely reacted and utilized his training, then became emotional afterward.

“Martinez was a hero yesterday. He was a flat-out hero,” Hirst said. “He’ll be a hero to me for as long as I live.”

Hirst said he is unsure how long Moore will be hospitalized — he was temporarily transported to Methodist Hospital on Wednesday for more tests — and does not anticipate him playing again this season.

#AT4ALLSecondary SchoolSudden Cardiac Death

Athletic trainer hailed as hero for saving North Las Vegas student’s life

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Article reposted from Las Vegas Review-Journal
Author: Art Marroquin

Chely Arias is already considered a hero just two months into her first job as a high school athletic trainer.

The North Las Vegas Fire Department credited Arias with saving a 17-year-old high school senior who collapsed Oct. 24 while warming up for a flag-football practice at Cheyenne High School.

“Her life was literally in my hands, and that’s a unique feeling to have,” Arias said shortly after a brief recognition ceremony held Wednesday in the school library. “Once you experience something like that, it changes your life.”

Arias couldn’t find a pulse when she aided Kennedi Jones just after 1:30 p.m. that day. The teen had stopped breathing and was unresponsive, prompting Arias to start CPR.

A flag football coach called 911 while a student retrieved one of the school’s three portable defibrillators from the gym.

Arias placed the automated external defibrillator pads on Jones’ chest, hoping an electrical shock would revive her. After three attempts, Jones finally had a pulse.

“It was devastating to walk up and see what was taking place at the time,” said Kimberly Jones, who arrived to watch Arias work on her daughter before paramedics arrived.

“As a mom, you never want to come to a scene and see things happen at that magnitude,” Kimberly Jones said. “She didn’t stop, she stayed focused and she was well-trained for this occasion.”

Jones was taken to University Medical Center, where she spent nearly two weeks in recovery. Like most teens, she just wanted to eat, walk around and go home. The teen said she didn’t have any previous medical problems and was enjoying her second year as a middle linebacker for the school’s intramural flag football team.

“I’m thankful because I could’ve died,” Jones quietly said. “She knew what she was doing. She saved my life.”

While presenting Arias with an accommodation plaque, North Las Vegas Fire Chief Joseph Calhoun said the athletic trainer’s effort demonstrated the need for more people to learn CPR and how to operate AED devices.

“Your actions and your quick thinking did an incredible thing,” Calhoun said. “It saved a young woman’s life for her to be able to grow up and become an adult and live a normal and happy life.”

Contact Art Marroquin at amarroquin@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0336. Follow @AMarroquin_LV on Twitter.

 

Sudden Cardiac Death

Athletic Trainer, AED device saves football player with enlarged heart

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Article reposted from KLTV7
Author: Brionna Rivers

Last night’s Carthage vs Henderson football game, took a dangerous turn when a 12-year-old Carthage player went into cardiac arrest during halftime. Athletic trainer Colby Barron, along with Henderson firefighters quickly administered care.

We immediately knew that something wasn’t good, the kid wasn’t breathing so we called 911 we sent for the AED,” says Barron.  “We got the kid’s pads off and immediately put the AED on him and unfortunately it had to shock him, the fire captain began CPR and luckily you know the kid began to breathe on his own again.”

Barron says having the AED or Automated External Defibrillator on hand was a must in this situation.

“If we wouldn’t have had the AED last night we could have had a different outcome,” says Barron.

An AED recognizes an abnormal rhythm in the heart and then shocks the heart to get it back into rhythm. Henderson Fire Captain Mark Marsh says it’s a lifesaving tool.

“It’s an automated device and it’s a very simple device so not only first responders but anybody can use it,” says Marsh.

Carthage ISD says the injured student, who was flown from the field to Shreveport Medical Center had an enlarged heart — a pre-existing condition.

Most of the time you don’t know when there could be a pre-existing condition, there’s not really any test that they do to recognize those,” Says Barron.  “They answer a questionnaire on their physical and check yes or no but you know that’s really the only thing that most people get done they don’t get an EKG they don’t get any heart test it’s not required to get those.”

Barron says the reason the tests aren’t required is probably due to the high cost but adds that the value of that information out ways the price.

Barron added that, “It could be beneficial if you can recognize one to two to three kids each year they may have a pre-existing condition and you save one life one would day the test is well worth it”

Carthage ISD says the student is still in the hospital in Shreveport where he will be held for a few days for testing. Depending on the results, he may be taken to a medical center in Dallas.

#AT4ALLSudden Cardiac Death

Quick-thinking Maryland Athletic Trainer helps save a man’s life

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Article reposted from Washington Post
Author: Scott Allen

It’s been an eventful few months for Anthony Benyarko since he became the Maryland men’s lacrosse team’s trainer in February. After the Terps captured their first national championship since 1975 on Memorial Day, Benyarko proposed to his girlfriend on the Gillette Stadium field. The intense emotions that Benyarko felt on that joyous day were rivaled by what he experienced on a lacrosse field in Lake Placid, N.Y., last Wednesday, when he helped save a man’s life.

Benyarko was in the trainer’s tent at the Lake Placid Summit Classic, a lacrosse tournament for men and women of all ages, when he received word that a player on the Ohio Wesleyan alumni team was experiencing chest pains. Before Benyarko and Penn trainer Anthony Erz, who also was working the tournament, started their 100-yard sprint toward Field 3, Benyarko thought to grab an automated external defibrillator.

“Something told me I should probably take the AED with me, just in case, because the group was 50-year-olds and up,” he said this week.

Benyarko and Erz arrived to find 54-year-old John Sussingham sitting up on the ground. While Erz called 911, Benyarko began talking to Sussingham, who said he felt tightness in his chest. About a minute later, Sussingham reported experiencing more intense chest pain and numbness in his left hand before losing consciousness. Benyarko did chest compressions and delivered a shock using the AED, which advised doing CPR.

“Halfway into my second cycle, his chest started to rise and he started breathing,” Benyarko said. “His eyes opened up again. We were pretty excited because your adrenaline is rushing, his wife was there, his son was there, all his teammates were there. That was a good moment, but we honestly celebrated too early.”

Sussingham’s chest pain returned and his arms went numb. State troopers told Benyarko and Erz that paramedics were on their way from Saranac Lake, which was 20 minutes away. Lake Placid volunteer EMT Mellissa “Missy” Furnia arrived on the scene and took over compressions after Sussingham had another heart attack and started to seizure. Benyarko worked to keep Sussingham’s airway open.

“You take the CPR course at the Red Cross and it’s nothing like the real thing,” Benyarko said. “People are screaming and yelling all around you. It’s really hard to focus. He started turning blue and I was getting a little bit worried and then the AED kicked back in. The AED advised a shock again. He had no pulse, so we started CPR, did CPR again, then it advised another shock. The third time we shocked him he started breathing again and his eyes opened.”

When the paramedics arrived, Benyarko said they gave Sussingham an IV and administered epinephrine. Sussingham started talking and was transported to a hospital, where the Adirondack Daily Enterprise reported he had a stent placed in his artery.

“I’m feeling great,” Sussingham told the Daily Enterprise the following day. A teammate texted Benyarko a photo of Sussingham giving the thumbs-up sign from his hospital bed.

“It was a relief,” said Benyarko, who never experienced a similar emergency during his 10 years as an athletic trainer at the University of Albany before coming to Maryland. “People asked me how long it took. I couldn’t tell you. I lost all track of time really. You were just concentrated on one thing, and it was great having other people there to help.”

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Maryland Coach John Tillman arrived at the tournament a couple of days later and asked Benyarko why he hadn’t told him about his lifesaving incident.

“I was just like, I don’t know, it’s not something you brag about in a group of people,” said Benyarko, whose wedding is set for September 2018. “It just happened and you try to move on from it, you know? It kind of got bigger than I thought it would. … This summer has definitely been a roller coaster. I’m blessed.”

PreventionSudden Cardiac Death

Tennessee Athletic trainer, defibrillator saves man at baseball game

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Article reposted from WKRN.com
Author: Adam Snider

A day at the ball park nearly turned to tragedy – if not for a quick thinking athletic trainer and a life saving device.

It was a box on the wall that tends to blend in – to which Thomas Hobson owes his life.
“Yeah I’m feeling good today,” said Hobson, relaxing outside his home. “Last few days, I’ve been feeling pretty good.”

One night last month, while catching his grandson’s baseball game at White House Heritage High School, Thomas took a dive.

“My head started spinning real fast,” he explained. “I looked down, looked like the sidewalk was coming up to me, but I was falling, that’s the last thing I knew.”

Thomas came to on a stretcher, being whisked away to a nearby hospital.

Officials explained he just suffered a heart attack. Hobson was still alive thanks to a nearby defibrillator, and a fully prepared athletic trainer.

Andrea Gowan is a trainer with Heritage High. She and Hobson met for the first time since the incident Friday afternoon.

“I got a call from a parent, and then I heard them call for me over the PA system,” said Gowan. “I ran from soccer, down to baseball.”

She soon spotted a collapsed Hobson, a crowd of people, and a defibrillator ready to go.

(Photo: WKRN)
“Hooked the AED up, cleared everybody back,” said Gowan. “It delivered one shock, and we restarted CPR, and luckily after that first set of CPR he actually came back.”

Andrea had been properly defibrillator trained, but most of the devices are made to be used by all, with clearly marked instructions, or even voice commands.

“So having them available for people to use, to help save people, it makes a huge difference,” said Gowan.

“I’m glad you were there,” added Hobson. “Yeah I’m glad you were there, ‘cause if you hadn’t been there, I wouldn’t be here today.”

Hobson now has a pace maker. He’s taking it easy at his doctor’s request, but says he’ll be back out watching baseball in no time.

Anyone interested in CPR, or defibrillator training, can visit the American Red Cross, or the American Heart Association.

A day at the ball park nearly turned to tragedy – if not for a quick thinking athletic trainer and a life saving device.

It was a box on the wall that tends to blend in – to which Thomas Hobson owes his life.

(Photo: WKRN)

“Yeah I’m feeling good today,” said Hobson, relaxing outside his home. “Last few days, I’ve been feeling pretty good.”

One night last month, while catching his grandson’s baseball game at White House Heritage High School, Thomas took a dive.

“My head started spinning real fast,” he explained. “I looked down, looked like the sidewalk was coming up to me, but I was falling, that’s the last thing I knew.”

Thomas came to on a stretcher, being whisked away to a nearby hospital.

Officials explained he just suffered a heart attack. Hobson was still alive thanks to a nearby defibrillator, and a fully prepared athletic trainer.

Andrea Gowan is a trainer with Heritage High. She and Hobson met for the first time since the incident Friday afternoon.

“I got a call from a parent, and then I heard them call for me over the PA system,” said Gowan. “I ran from soccer, down to baseball.”

She soon spotted a collapsed Hobson, a crowd of people, and a defibrillator ready to go.

(Photo: WKRN)

“Hooked the AED up, cleared everybody back,” said Gowan. “It delivered one shock, and we restarted CPR, and luckily after that first set of CPR he actually came back.”

Andrea had been properly defibrillator trained, but most of the devices are made to be used by all, with clearly marked instructions, or even voice commands.

“So having them available for people to use, to help save people, it makes a huge difference,” said Gowan.

“I’m glad you were there,” added Hobson. “Yeah I’m glad you were there, ‘cause if you hadn’t been there, I wouldn’t be here today.”

Hobson now has a pace maker. He’s taking it easy at his doctor’s request, but says he’ll be back out watching baseball in no time.

Anyone interested in CPR, or defibrillator training, can visit the American Red Cross, or the American Heart Association.

PreventionSudden Cardiac Death

CSULB Athletic Trainer and Intern Honored for Saving a Student’s Life

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Article reposted from Long Beach Post
Author: ARIANA GASTELUM

The California Athletic Trainers’ Association (CATA) honored Cal State Long Beach athletic training intern and student Tori Mulitauaopele and Golden West College Athletic Trainer Pat Frohn with the “Lifesaver Award” for rescuing track athlete Javier Venegas after he collapsed at a Golden West College (GWC) track meet, officials announced Friday.

Today, Venegas is fully recovered from what was determined to be a heart arrhythmia. He returned to school during the first week of February.

“Each cardiologist who saw him, at three different hospitals, said Javier was alive today because these individuals took action,” Javier’s mother Valerie Venegas said in a statement. “Luckily, the right people were in at the right place at the right time; this could have been a very different story.”

The ceremony recalled the actions that took place at the track meet, which occurred January 25.

Shortly after Venegas collapsed on the track, GWC’s track coach notified Frohn and Mulitauaopele, who were in Frohn’s office at the time. The two sprung into action, grabbing an emergency pack and racing to the scene.

“After checking his vitals, I confirmed Javier wasn’t breathing and didn’t have a pulse,” Frohn said during the ceremony. “At that point, I took over chest compressions and instructed Tori to start rescue breathing.”

Frohn used an automated external defibrillator while he and Mulitauaopele performed CPR. These actions resulted in the jolt where Venegas’ heart started beating, and he began breathing. At this point, the EMT arrived to transport the athlete to the emergency room, where he was put into a medically-induced coma.

Additionally, during the ceremony, CATA President Jason Bennett brought awareness to the fact that California currently remains the only state in the nation that doesn’t regulate athletic training.

“Anyone––regardless of education and certification–– can act as an athletic trainer and treat serious injuries with potentially dire consequences,” he said. “For the sake of our children, this needs to end now.”

Bennett added that the CATA and Assemblymember Matt Debabneh recently introduced legislation AB-1510, which would require licensure for athletic trainers in California.

“Beyond saving a life, Pat and Tori changed the lives of many,” State Senator Janet Nguyen said at the event. “As a parent, I can understand the deep sense of gratitude that the Venegas family has for Pat and Tori. As a neighbor to Golden West College, I am thankful to know that we have great staff and students that go beyond the call of duty to serve others. And as a believer in humanity, I am comforted in knowing that kindness and goodwill are among us.”

#AT4ALLPreventionSudden Cardiac Death

Oklahoma Athletic Trainer Hailed Hero After Saving Referee

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Article reposted from News9.com
Author: KARL TORP

News9.com – Oklahoma City, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports |

An athletic trainer in Harrah is being hailed a hero for coming to the aid of a referee who collapsed on the field.

It happened during the second overtime of a district soccer match between Harrah High School and Classen SAS Tuesday night.

“He didn’t trip, He didn’t fall, he just collapsed and I need to be there,” said Harrah athletic Geoff Hargis about what was going through his mind.

Hargis immediately started performing CPR and was aided by two parents from Classen. One happened to be a cardiologist.

“We were doing compressions and he’d take a breath, but we couldn’t get a solid pulse on him,” said Hargis.

Paramedics would soon arrive, as Hargis and others witnessed the man regain consciousness.

“Very relieved,” said Hargis.

But all anxiety wouldn’t be gone until Wednesday morning, when Hargis got a chance to speak with the referee.

“It was good to hear him talk in knowing that we were successful in keeping him alive,” said Hargis.

Due to budget constraints, athletic trainers are not always available for games.

Harrah’s athletic director is thankful the referee got help so quickly.

“We appreciate Geoff, but we appreciate all the athletic directors all over country that do what they do,” said Athletic Director Guy Worth.

PreventionSecondary SchoolSudden Cardiac Death

New Jersey Athletic Trainers Honored for Life Saving Efforts

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Article reposted from Burlington County Times
Author:

Friday, Feb. 17, started out as a normal day for Cherokee High School teacher Janet Pulverenti.

Her students had a half-day, and she was on her way to the school’s Performing Arts Center to complete some afternoon professional development with fellow teachers and staff members.

But as Pulverenti entered the room, her heart started beating quickly. She went into cardiac arrest and fell unconscious.

Luckily, four co-workers did more than just call 911. They also used CPR and an automated external defibrillator (AED) to revive Pulverenti in only about three minutes.

“Without them, I would not be here,” she said. “The doctors made it very clear to me that I shouldn’t be here.”

Head athletic trainer Jeff Wood, assistant athletic trainer Karen Hengst, paraprofessional Gary Denelsbeck and nurse-paraprofessional Felicia Progar were all honored as heroes at the Lenape Regional Board of Education meeting on Wednesday.

After Pulverenti went into cardiac arrest, staff members began calling 911 and using school radios to alert administrators, Superintendent Carol Birnbohm said. Denelsbeck and Progar, who were in the room, immediately began performing CPR.

“We had basketball practice going on,” said Hengst, who was in the gymnasium with Wood when they heard the calls over the radio.

The two, who are certified athletic trainers, quickly grabbed the AED and used it to shock Pulverenti’s heart. She regained consciousness almost immediately.

“The AED is what gave (Janet) her life,” Wood said.

Pulverenti said it was incredible that colleagues came from different parts of the building to come to her aid.

All involved expressed gratitude that they were in the right place at the right time.

Pulverenti, a teacher in the district for 14 years, said her husband and six children were equally grateful.

“I can’t express my gratitude enough,” she told the four after they received plaques and resolutions from the school board. “Thank you for my life.”

Birnbohm said she hopes the story of quick action and training will inspire others to invest in AEDs and train people about their effectiveness.

“Not only are we honoring you, but perhaps this story might make someone become more aware of the location of the AEDs in their building or community,” she said. “And just maybe, because someone heard your story, you will be responsible for saving more lives.”